8 Habits Of A Good Freelance Writer


Are you tired of those dry spells that make you return back to begging and asking for work as a freelance writer?

It happens. One day you are flush with so many works, cranking out copy, and making a good income. And after that you realize your freelance marketing endeavors haven’t been all that great.

Projects come to an end. You are paid. And afterward you’re scrambling to find more customers that need a freelance writer.

Been there? Done that?

In case you are that kind of freelance writer, it can be exhausting. It’s kind of like attempting to make your way over a desert with no water. However, it doesn’t need to be that way.

#1. Write epic content

The best paying businesses and blogs are not looking for fluff. They are looking for 1 of these 3 things:

1. Inspiration
2. Entertainment
3. Education and how-to posts
In case you’re writing something to share to the world, ensure it does one of these three things. If you will blog on your own site, or you are writing for clients, do your best work. Your link or byline can help send more customer work your way.

#2. Go beyond expectations

Stand out as an author by going beyond writing a decent post.

For instance, if you’re writing a how-to post, add data, screenshots or examples to demonstrate your point. That’s the distinction between being a normal freelance writer who gets a one-and-done assignment, and the freelance writer clients continue sending work to. Which would you rather be?

#3. Do a good job, and make sure everybody knows about it

When you accomplish something to stand out, it has a tremendous effect. Also, people should know about it. As a fully booked freelance writer, you should work a little uniquely in contrast to most. Rather than simply fixing grammar and typos help writers to improve their style and voice, and connect with readers. Furthermore, it’s a game changer.

Don’t have any testimonials? After you complete a task for a client, ask for a testimonial through LinkedIn, email, or another platform you prefer. After that, promote the hell out of it. Do a good job, and make sure everyone knows about it.

#4. Self-Publish a book

There’s no better way to indicate you’re a specialist in your niche than writing a book. Truly, you can do this. Furthermore, you don’t a publisher, a book contract or an agent.

When I was posted to a remote area for an NYSC, I needed to continue earning cash while I took time off. So I wrote some books.

It such a perfect example of why writing is one of the best jobs for a freelancer or anybody who wants flexibility. I published my book before the NYSC came to an end, then enjoyed making money via book sales even while I took time off.

Not just will self-publishing e-books give you another revenue source, it will enhance your credibility to write for greater clients as well.

#5. Find bigger clients with more ongoing work

What amount of time have you spent written one single letter and shopping it around to various magazines to land an assignment?

There’s nothing wrong with this kind of writing. Awesome magazine writing gigs pay $1/word or more. However, it’s generally a one-and-done kind of task. And after that you need to start the pitching process all over again.

In the event that you want to write for magazines, good. However, in the event that you need a less demanding way to remain fully-booked as a freelance writer, focus around finding clients who will have continuous work so you can invest more time writing… and less time pitching.

Cold pitching prospects by writing a letter of introduction, or connecting through LinkedIn is a brilliant strategy to land more clients. Resources like the Junk Free Job Board in the Freelance Writers Den can likewise help you find customers or clients with ongoing content needs.

#6. Use data to write about high-traffic topics

What are your ideal clients discussing? Or on the other hand in case you are writing for a client, what topic should you write about to drive traffic and increase audience engagement.

Don’t guess. Rather, utilize free tools like SocialCount.co or BuzzSumo.com to discover which posts and topics your target audience or readers love and share the most.

When you use data to pick your key phrases or topics, and after that write an epic post with heaps of helpful information, you are going to increase your reach and be seen by many people. Also, some of that traffic will return to you in the form of prospects who want to hire you.

#7. Be open-minded

You never know when another freelance writing work opportunity is going to present itself. Be liberal.

A one off job could become an ongoing work. Perhaps a writing task will turn into a ghostwriting, an editing or speaking opportunity.

I have had blog writing jobs turn into ghostwriting, blog editing, ghostwriting, online course writing/editing, book editing and speaking gigs.

Assess and evaluate your current customers. Is there any potential for more work? Or on the other hand have you asked your current customers or clients for referrals? Opportunities and chances to move up and earn more are all over the place. You just have to look and be open minded to discover them.

#8. Do it scared

Virtually majority of the milestones in freelance career involved taking risks to do things I wanted to run from for fear of failure. But I believe if you are not uncomfortable, you are not growing and developing.

What are you afraid of? Making more money, failure, charging higher rates, or working with big name clients or brands? Face your fears then do it anyway.

Make a connection
Pitch an idea with a query letter
Send an LOI
Learn to use analytics and data
Ask for referrals
Write a book
Pitch a guest post
Keep marketing

Be a fully booked freelance writer

You’ll only realize what you’re capable of if you keep reaching outside your comfort zone and hustling. That’s how you become a fully booked freelance writer. Consistently do these eight things and you will never need to search for work or write for pennies again.

Source: https://www.akeentech.com/8-habits-of-a-fully-booked-freelance-writer/

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